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There's bass lures that work and then there's lures you can serve with coffee The time has come! Spring is here, the sun will be shinning late into Autumn this year, and the fish are promising to be jumping in the boats, especially that most delectable of fish, the bass. You need only gather a formidable array of bass fishing lures to entice them, and, as you'll see, a little java helps. Bass fishermen, like all fishermen, differ sharply on which are the best bass fishing lures, the ones sure to get that strike every time it comes in sight and smell of that slimy delight. Live swimming grub or a lure imitating grub have proven effective for snatching those bass ten to fifteen feet deep. Live grub wag their tails in a subtle manner, which brings attention from those bass below, so if you're using artificial grub, assure their tails will wag gently as you fan cast around your boat. Use a steady retrieve, slow and smooth. Shad coloured grub lures are especially attractive. Many bass fishermen use spinner baits, but most find these sink too slowly and the action doesn't fool the bass. Interestingly enough, a one half ounce Sonar has properties that call those bass like a school of shad. The metal blade vibrates and the lure sinks quickly, hitting the bottom with a hard thud. The size of a threadfin shad will catch the eye of any bass. You're sure to land your max with these. Switch blades are popular bass fishing lures for catching bass, the Heddon Sonar, the Reef Runner Cicada, and Wordens Showdown are popular and very effective lures. These lures are normally fished vertically, but many cast them for more extensive coverage. Cast these out about 15 feet, let them fall to 20 feet, then pump it back up to 15, repeating this until you've completed the retrieve. Aim in another direction and try again. The more area you cover, the greater likelihood you'll hook that large one. Soft plastic bass fishing lures have also produced good results. These are constructed almost like a fly. The hair and feathers are neatly tied to the soft, plastic bodies. Some sparkling flash material is also tied to the body. Nothing like flash to spark that bass' interest. These lures may imitate worms, shad and grub. They are more a work of art than a lure, but perhaps there are art-loving bass out there too. An interesting bass lure that eerily seems to have considerable success is the coffee tube. The tub is soft plastic oiled with coffee oil and, of course, the hook at one end. Apparently, the bass can't resist it. Chum with coffee grinds? In addition to the commercially sold bass fishing lures, you also have the option of making your own lure. You can melt some lead, such as soft-lead catfish sinkers. Construct a mold and set within it the hooks nicely spaced. Then dribble the mold to close the lead [...]